Navajo County

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Navajo County Public Health Services
Nursing Services
Polio Vaccine

Polio is a disease caused by a virus. It enters a child’s (or adult’s) body through the mouth. Sometimes it does not cause serious illness. But sometimes it causes paralysis (can’t move arm or leg). It can kill people who get it, usually by paralyzing the muscles that help them breathe.

Polio used to be very common in the United States. It paralyzed and killed thousands of people a year before we had a vaccine for it.

Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) can prevent polio.

History

A 1916 polio epidemic in the United States killed 6,000 people and paralyzed 27,000 more. In the early 1950’s there were more than 20,000 cases of polio each year. Polio vaccination was begun in 1955. By 1960 the number of cases had dropped to about 3,000, and by 1979 there were only about 10. The success of polio vaccination in the U.S. and other countries sparked a world-wide effort to eliminate polio.

Today

No wild polio has been reported in the United States for over 20 years. But the disease is still common in some parts of the world. It would only take one case of polio from another country to bring the disease back if we were not protected by vaccine. If the effort to eliminate the disease from the world is successful, some day we won’t need polio vaccine. Unitl then, we need to keep getting our children vaccinated.

Most children should get 4 doses of polio vaccine at these ages:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 12 - 18 months
  • 4 - 6 years

Oral Polio Vaccine

No longer recommended.

Types of Polio Vaccine

IPV, which is the shot recommended in the United States today, and a live, oral polio vaccine (OPV), which is drops that are swollowed.

Until recently OPV was recommended for most children in the United States. OPV helped us rid the country of polio, and it is still used in many parts of the world.

Both vaccines give immunity to polio, but OPV is better at keeping the disease from spreading to other people. However, for a few people (about one in 2.4 million), OPV actually causes polio. Since the risk of getting polio in the United States is now extremely low, experts believe that using oral polio vaccine is no longer worth the slight risk, except in limited cirucumstances which your doctor can describe. The polio shot (IPV) does not cause polio. If you or your child will be getting OPV, ask for a copy of the OPV supplemental Vacine Information Statement.


For more information, visit your local health department or Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Arizona Department of Health.

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